3 Easy Steps for Boot Cleaning

Cleaning all your tack and riding wear is essential for maintenance and to increase the products lifespan.

I clean my Veredus Soprano GUARNIERI boots normally every two to three days depending on their condition.

Before & After

 

Items you will need:

  1. Leather Cleanser
  2. Leather Conditioner/Balsam
  3. Soft Cloth/soft towel
  4. Hard Brush

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I place my leaning products in a grooming box at home. I will be using the LEXOL leather cleaner, which you can find at almost all tack shops here in the UAE; along with the Veredus Curium Balsam, which you can find at Cavalos tack shop.


Step 1: Spray the leather cleaner either onto your boot or on the cloth/towel and move in circular motion.

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Step 2: Wait a few minutes for the cleanser to dry, then swab your a clean cloth/towel onto your balsam/conditioner and apply onto boots in circular motion.

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Step 3: Wait again a couple of minutes for the conditioner to try, then buff it out with a hard brush to add some polish.

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Note: There are a number of different cleaning products in the market today, so just make sure you get one that is suitable for the leather you have on your boots as it varies. If you are unsure, then it is safest to stick with getting cleaners from the boot brand itself; e.g Veredus boots = Veredus cleaner.

Happy cleaning 🙂

HorZe Grand Prix Self Patch Breeches REVIEW

Breeches are key for riding. Having a good pair of breeches is not only great for image, but also for your riding style. Many riders prefer the full seat breeches, or the super thin breech tights, however, i personally prefer knee patch or self patch breeches. HorZe Equestrian has a selection of riding breeches depending on the season and your personal preference, from the material to the style. Today i am reviewing the HorZe Grand Prix Self  Breeches which retail for approximately 390 AED at DubaiPetFood & Horseworld.

Created with our exclusive Dura Tough fabric made to out-perform and outlast other breeches while maintaining the comfort a rider demands. A self-fabric seat, knee patches, broad concealed waistband and a metal Z belt charm add to the fashionable look of these gorgeous breeches. This classic breech is great to add to your wardrobe. Very flattering to women, the outline of the seat and line that runs down the thigh creates a slimming effect.

Materials: 53% Cotton 40% Polyamide 7% Elastane

The Grand Prix breeches have a wide waist band, with two buttons. The belt loops can fit a 2″ belt. The design of the breeches is very minimalistic with just a Z charm infront, velcro ankle closer, and a set of flags in a line on the back with the Euro Seat.

Note: The colour of the breeches below was a limited summer collection of 2013.

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The HorZe breeches were one of the first I brought. They do come in many different colours which is always a plus; nonetheless, they do have their flaws, and first of which is their durability. I found that with time, the elasticity tends to loosen and wrinkle as seen below:

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This is very disappointing as the breeches are not exactly cheap. Out of the 4 that i own, 2 of them have this issue, even though i follow the washing steps provided via the website. On the bright side, these breeches are great for our middle eastern winter and are super comfortable. I do not recommend using them during the summer or humid days as they become sticky and heavy. I also love the fact that they have Velcro ankle closure as i do have small ankles and the new CS2 bottoms are usually too loose on me. This however, may be a negative to others, but luckily the new designs do have the CS2 bottom option.


Pros

  • Comfortable
  • Simple
  • Wide waist band
  • Good for cooler weather
  • Variety of colours
  • Good length

Cons

  • Not too durable
  • Elastic loosens over time
  • Can’t be used all year round (not for summer/humid days)
  • Pricey

Would i purchase these again? If the lack of durability stays the same, then probably not to be honest. I just have 2 left out of the 4 that i have that i can wear and i know that with time, they will get loose elastics too  😦

Deworming Your Horse

Horses, like any other grazing animals, need to be dewormed at least twice a year if not every 4 months, depending on the amount spent in paddocks.

Tofino goes out in grass paddocks every morning and afternoon, therefore, i personally deworm him around every 4 months. Even if your horse doesn’t have access to grass paddock, it is still a good idea to deworm them every 6 months as a preventative as worms can also grow on contaminated food, water, brushes, etc.

Deworming comes in both a pill base and a paste base. I personally use the paste as it is given less often. It is important to note that worms can develop resistance to a dewormer, therefore, it is crucial to alternate between different kinds.

When using any dewormer, make sure to read the instructions and follow according to your horses weight. If you are not sure how much your horse weighs, you can easily calculate it without a scale by measuring the full girth length and your horse’s length then calculate it:

  • [Girth (cm) × Girth (cm) × Length (cm)] / 11,900 = Weight(kg)

or

  • [Girth (in) × Girth (in) × Length (in)] / 330 = Weight (lb)

Here is a video to further explain the technique:

A good way to keep track of the name and type of your dewormer is to keep a journal, or a great a photo album in your phone and take pictures of the dewormers to make sure you don’t buy the same one consecutively.

Worms do thrive in moist, warm environments. If your horse looks thin and doesn’t have a healthy shiny coat, he most likely is infected with worms.


How to Deworm your horse:

When you use a paste dewormer, put the syringe in the corner of your horse’s mouth and aim for the back of his tongue. Squirt the paste in one quick motion. Raise your horses head if necessary to encourage swallowing.

Here is a video on how to deworm your horse:

Happy deworming 🙂 !