B Vertigo Kimberley Breeches [REVIEW]

I got these breeches last year, first time trying B Vertigo, so I was hesitant but the detail and fabric won me over.

The B Vertigo Kimberely Breeches come in both knee patch and full seat, however, I will only be reviewing the knee patch as it is the pair I have.

Features:

  • 4-way stretch
  • Contrasting leg stripe
  • Elegant back pocket embroidery
  • Quality-made for durability and long lasting use
  • Breathable
  • Moisture-wicking material

BV Cool-Power Fabric: Materials: 79% Tactel, 16% Coolmax, 5% Elastane.


I did find that they are true to size. They are on the pricey side, however, you can get them on sale at certain times. They can be ordered either from www.TackShop.ae or www.DubaiPetFood.com

(click to enlarge)
  


The breeches fit very neatly and feel super comfortable on and off the horse. They have two front pockets and back pockets which are all deep enough to fit your phone. The detailing is so precise and beautiful. I am in love with the contrast stitching. There is a double hook button closure on the waist, a medallion on the front belt loop, and a metal logo plate on the belt loop (which can’t be seen here but is shown in the pic above).

  


The belt loop width is around 2″ which I find very comfortable. That being said, I do only own 1.5″ belts but it still looks fine. The material is breathable and super comfortable especially in this heat and humidity. I see no sign of wear and tear so far, and they have not stretched or shrunk.


The knee patch is not functional and is only there for design. I do find that the breeches are loose starting from under the knee. I am not sure if this is due to me having smaller calves and ankles than normal or other’s have the same issue.

They have a sock bottom which most modern riding pants have, but I personally prefer velcro as I can adjust the tightness.


Pros: Cons:
  Breathable 

  Durable

•  Super comfortable

•  Good fit

•  Great detail 

•  Functional pockets

•   Pricey side

•  Loose from knee to ankle

•  Sock ankle ( I prefer adjustable velcro)

Verdict: I would definitely recommend these breeches as they are really comfortable and durable which is surprising for Dubai’s hot sticky weather. Although they do not fit me well from knee downwards, I still love them heaps!

West Nile Virus [IMPORTANT!]

This virus has come to my attention due to the fact that one of the horses in our stables has the symptoms for West Nile Virus.

West Nile Virus (WNV) causes an inflammation of the central nervous system. Both humans and animals can get infected from a mosquito that is carrying the virus. WNV occurs mostly in the late summer or early autumn.


SYMPTOMS

Those infected may show zero signs of illness, however, if the virus reaches the central nervous system, it can cause encephalitis (brain swelling). For horses, the symptoms can take 5-15 days to show, which include the following:

  • loss of appetite
  • depression
  • fever
  • weakness of hind limbs
  • paralysis of hind limbs
  • impaired vision
  • ataxia (weakness)
  • head pressing
  • aimless wandering
  • convulsions (seizures)
  • inability to swallow
  • walking in circles
  • hyperexcitability
  • coma

TREATMENT

There is no specific antibody to counter attack the virus, therefore, depending on the affect the virus has on each individual horse, a treatment plan should be developed.

  • Control fever if present.
  • Ensure horse receives sufficient fluids and feed. Oral or intravenous feeding may also be necessary for horses unable to eat.
  • If mobility is compromised, slinging is recommended 2 to 3 times per day to aid in circulation and to try to prevent pressure point sores (bed sores).
  • If horse keeps collapsing, head and leg protection will be necessary.
  • Treating secondary events if noticed. These may include joint and tendon infections, sheath infections, pneumonia, and diarrhea, all due to overall weakness and lack of mobility.

Horses can improve within 5 to 7 days after showing sings of the virus, however, 20-30% can show severe neurological deficits for a few weeks. Moreover, mortality rate is around 33%, whereas full recover is around 50%, and relapse or incomplete recover is around 17%.


PREVENTION

There is a vaccination that requires two doses, given 3-6 weeks apart. That being said, the protection will not develop until around 4-6 weeks after the second dose.
Note: 36 hours rest post vaccination for horses

Try and keep the stables clean and free from mosquito breeding habitats which include tires, wheelbarrows, old buckets, etc.),. Roof and gutters should also be cleaned constantly.

  • Keep horses indoors during active mosquito times (dawn/dusk)
  • Use fans
  • Use flysheets
  • Flyspray
  • Insecticide mist
  • Turn off lights that attract mosquitoes at night, or use fluorescent lights, which do not attract mosquitoes.
  • Keep an eye out for dead birds around the stables

It is very crucial to get your horse vaccinated, of if they are, continue to give them boosters when necessary.

Keep safe! Hope this helps

End of Season Haul

Today I attended a warehouse sale at  Al Sakb Equestrian here in the UAE.

I managed to get my hands on  a few things which I am very excited about!
from Left to Right:

  • Kinglsand Equestrian Kelly Slim Fit breeches in Navy, Black and Beige.
  • Kinglsand Equestrian Unisex one size Cap in Navy
  • Equestrian Stockholm No Limit Vest


Check out the image below for more information on the location and duration of the sale. 

 

Riding Gymnastics Exercises

Gymnastics in riding is very helpful when it comes to jumping your horse. It not only helps develop your horses muscles, but also help the rider to better understand and play around with striding.

Benefits of Gymnastics Exercises:

  • Develops confidence in both horse and rider
  • Gain better balance
  • Learning to stay on a consistent rhythm
  • Corrects drifting/improves straightness
  • Helps in understanding/controlling striding
  • Helps in developing equitation

Generally, there are 3 phases, which include trot poles, cross pole, vertical and an oxer. This gives you a variety to work with and better understand the feel over the jumps.

You mostly start with trotting over the trot poles, however, there are some who prefer to just canter straight towards the cross pole. It depends on your riding and training.

Here is a video that helps to explain the 3 parts:

I personally need to work on this a lot! It is a good exercise to do at least once a week, even if it is only poles on the ground.

Hope this helps 🙂

Tips to Buying a Horse

I have been asked a few times what to look for when buying a new horse, or the average cost etc.

Therefore, I decided to write up this post just to summarize some crucial points to keep in mind before purchasing a horse.

Things to think of before considering buying a horse:

  • Determine your level: If you are a beginner, it is best to stick with riding schools or leasing rather than owning a horse until you are a little more experienced
  • Commitment: Are you ready to commit to taking care of a horse and riding it often?
  • Cost: A horse’s price may range, but the cost of livery and other services they need for maintenance is costly with each month
  • Outcome: Why are you looking to buy a horse? what is your goal? Leisure riding? competing? etc.
  • Look around: Do not settle for one breeder/seller, ask around and see what’s out there
  • Ask around: Do not be afraid to ask horse owners about the lifestyle and their experience with their horses
  • Get Help: Do not attempt to go ride a horse on your own. Make sure you have a knowledgable trainer, friend, horse owner etc, with you
  • People are not always honest: Hard truth is that people lie, whether it be about the horse, price, history etc. So keep that in mind.

Things to think of when considering a horse:

  • Pick a discipline: as horses of different breeds are used for different disciplines 
  • Keep options open: Just because you liked an ad for one horse, it doesn’t mean you shouldn’t look at others
  • Take an experienced person with you
  • Watch the horse being lead walking and trotting
  • Observe as being ridden: Ask seller or person with you to ride the horse beforehand if you are not comfortable
  • Ride the horse yourself
  • Check horse’s behaviour: Loading in trailer, stable manners, farrier etc.
  • Temper: are they too temperamental or too lazy?
  • Experience: What have they done in the past? Schoolmaster? green? 
  • Age: Old does not mean experienced and vise versa
  • Horse History: Check the horses medical and training history
  • Price: Are they worth the price asked? Always negotiate 
  • VET CHECK VET CHECK VET CHECK! I cannot stress enough about this, but make sure you do a vet check that is not in the same location as the horse is generally in, as things may be overlooked or gotten used to.

I hope I didn’t forget anything els, if so please comment below 🙂

 

 

Tips to Loading Difficult Horses

Ever since Tofino’s sight has been deteriorating, he has been very difficult to load onto the trailer, even though we never had a problem with loading at all before.

First thing first, NEVER use force. No whips, chains, hitting etc. The reason why a horse won’t load is either because it’s something new and need to get used to it, or it’s because they are genuinely afraid for many reasons.

  1. Be patient
  2. Open the side door of the trailer so the area feels less claustrophobic
  3. Having a horse already inside will help to ease anxiety and doubt
  4. Lead your horse yourself as they probably trust YOU
  5. Allow your horse to walk around the trailer and sniff it out
  6. Reward with each step
  7. Talk to your horse gently
  8. If that fails, simply cover your horses eyes with a jumper or towel and lead them inside (this seems to work most of the time)

Note: Don’t forget your safety travel gear!

2016-11-17-photo-00001400  2016-11-17-photo-00001399

If you have any specific technique you know of, please do not hesitate to share. Personally, I have been using the above steps and ended up having to cover his face once which worked like a charm. Without doing so, it would take me 20 minutes to load otherwise.

Hope this helps

Teuton Germany Protection Vest [REVIEW]

Riding protection vests are not only used for eventing and cross country, but can also be used for jumping or even beginner riders.

I have been using mine for the past 5 years whenever I am jumping. I use the Teuton Germany Protection Vest which I found years ago in Tack n Track.


Although the vest is bulky, I find that it doesn’t alter my movements while riding. It has velcro on both shoulders and the waist, allowing you to open it on one side or both, making it easier to wear and remove.

img_7017  img_7019


The vest is perforated for better breathability, however, I still do find myself sweating, but nonetheless, never overheating. You can easily remove the lining for washing by opening the velcro on the back and simply sliding it off.

img_7020  img_7021


The vest is in line with the old European standards: EN 13158:BETA2000 which have been stopped in 2011, with the current standards now being EN 13158:BETA2009. However, since I do not do cross-country or eventing, this one suits me just fine for now. If I were to get a new one, I would definitely recommend getting the up do date standards.


Pros: Cons:
  Easy to put on/off and move with

  Great adjustability

•  Easy to wash

•  Lightweight

•   Bulky

•  Currently out of date with standards

 

Verdict: I would definitely recommend this vest, although it is bulky, I have been greatly satisfied with how it held up and how easy and light it is. If you plan on buying a new one though, make sure it the latest standard.